Exercise 2.2 People and Activity – In the Style of Darzacq

The brief is quite lengthy so I have left it at the bottom of the page. Yet again I have not followed the brief to the letter. The brief was clear that this exercise is about planning after researching photographers to prepare for a style of photography that we wish to make. Plan for the type of shots, sketch ideas and then go out and shoot. I may do this once I have researched other photographers. I enjoy making photography following a plan. The process is satisfying, and I do have some ideas (I will also present a different series for this exercise later on in the week). There is a lot of noise in some of the images, and there are some that are not sharp enough and tha tI would not use out side of my studies. The series later in the week has the better photos, but these are the ones in the style of Denis Darzacq.

However the opportunity arose and I took it and I also believe that is a big part of photography. See the opportunity, think on your feet and shoot. On the Friday I learned the Chinese state circus were visiting, and on the Sunday I took my camera and went. I set my focus to AF C (21) because I was aware that I would be shooting people who were moving very quickly. I wanted to freeze movement and capture movement. Being aware of the brief I considered that making photos that cover the whole event, building, circus ring, audience, stage hands and performers. Using manual settings have become more natural for me, and I was able to take photos and adjust the settings on my camera very quickly. It was not ease because there were so many lighting changes and I had to change the ISO frequently. Mistakes happened and I got the exposure wrong from time to time. Although I am not presenting the contact sheets, I have a good workflow in place now and use my own version of 100, 75, 50, 25.

These are not the best shots of the day, but having researched Denis Darzaq during the Workflow coursework I hoped that I would get some photos in a similar style.

Exercise 2.2 People and Activity

Exercise 2.2 People and Activity

Exercise 2.2 People and Activity

Exercise 2.2 People and Activity

Exercise 2.2 People and Activity

Exercise 2.2 People and Activity

Exercise 2.2 People and Activity

Exercise 2.2 People and Activity

Exercise 2.2 People and Activity

Exercise 2.2 People and Activity

Exercise 2.2 People and Activity

Exercise 2.2 People and Activity

Brief:-

In this exercise, the activity is your main subject. Don’t just go out and shoot; choose your activity in advance so you can prepare for it.

  • Before you begin shooting, ask yourself what kind of photographs you want to make. Will they be candid photographs like Henri Cartier-Bresson’s or distant views of activity like Andreas Gursky’s? Will you seek out key gestures, facial expressions and telling relationships like Martin Parr or make ‘snapshots’ of characters in the maelstrom of life-like Robert Frank? Will you try to frame the activity in a specific lighting effect like Trent Parke or will you seek to capture cultural details like Manuel Álvarez Bravo? Go online and research these well-known practitioners.
  • Try to define the way of seeing you want to achieve. Will you be distant, close, in the action, or will you bring the subject out of the situation like Richard Avedon, as you did with the leaves?
  • Research the type of photography or a particular photographer that inspires you. What have other photographers done with similar subject matter or with a similar approach? Ask your tutor for help finding good examples.
  • Pre-visualise images and sketch or note down any ideas, e.g. capturing two strangers glancing at one another. You may not find this shot, but it hones your mind and makes you more observant and ‘ready’ for similar glances or relationships.
  • Equipment: What equipment will you need for this project? Will you need a tripod or a flash?
  • Planning: Do you need to get permission to make photographs in a particular place? Sort out travel and timing. Will you need to have a special vantage point?
  • On the day, be observant: STOP! LOOK! THINK! Look carefully around you at the details of what is happening visually
  • Look at people’s faces and the way they express their character with facialexpressions, posture, gesture and movement.
  • What do their clothes say about their social status, gender or character?
  • What does the location say about them? Think about the way an environment can be ordered into a composition within the frame.
  • SHOOT! Take a lot of photos. This will give you more choice in the edit.
  • Upload your photos.
  • First edit: Look carefully at each shot and make a considered selection of about 50% of your photos. Don’t delete the photos, just mark the best shots.
  • Second edit: Wait about 24 hours until you perform your second edit. Then, with a fresh pair of eyes, edit them to around 25%.
  • Third edit: Edit down to around 10% or less of your original quantity. This is the best of your work but could later be refined even further. This process of editing could be called 100/50/25/10.
  • Perform any cropping, straightening and image adjustments on your final selection.

 

References

Keys, R; 2017; Exercise 1.12 Smash – Denis Darzacq; https://photosociology.wordpress.com/2017/07/20/exercise-1-12-smash-denis-darzacq/ (accessed on 26/09/2017)

 

 

3 Replies to “Exercise 2.2 People and Activity – In the Style of Darzacq”

  1. I am really enjoying the photographs you took at this Chinese State Circus event Richard. I know that event photography is your favourite place to be and it really shows. Wonderful colours.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.