My Initial Definition Of Still Life

I am shortly going to embark upon part four of Foundations in Photography with the Open College of the Arts. Although I am not going to begin the coursework exercises until I return from London, I am going to read the manual before I go. I am sure that London will provide additional opportunities for me.

Recently I have been taking some test photos so that I can explore Still Life and what it currently means to me.

My starting point is of course my schooling. Still Life in art classes was focused upon fruit, flowers and pasta in a jam jar. I am aware that still life in art and photography often focuses upon these, and in the days of mobile phones  meals have become very popular to photograph and display upon social media.

I am going to posit that Still Life in art and photography are secondary features of themselves they are  not Still Life.

“Still life is how people organise material or natural possessions, food stuffs, homes, the working environment, and shops. Photography and art develop from our basic need to be organised in order to function, and to possess objects as a means of individuation and pleasure. Often when we hear the words Still Life, we think of works of art or photography, and these are mistakenly believed to be the primary experience of Still Life. This is a misperception, and these are secondary reflections upon how we live our own lives.

Still Life in art and photography is the arrangement, organisation and presentation of objects for display, classification, documentation and study. Still Life is most often aesthetically pleasing, organised and an accurate representation of the subject.”

 

9 Replies to “My Initial Definition Of Still Life”

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