For The Love Of Tree’s

Tree’s are my my connection with mother nature, a source of spiritual connection and joy. I ordered two more for my birthday, to add to my growing collection. I talk to them all in the morning and I believe this is helping these outdoor beauties to live and thrive in my home. If you grow trees I would love to connect, I’m often left with questions which I cannot find answers too.

fznorcalamondin citrofortunella – I over-fed this small orange tree last winter and had to prune it right back. I’m amazed that it has grown back so well, and two new branches are beginning to grow at the top of the trunk.

 

fznorFicus Carica “scone” – I also over fed my fruit bearing fig tree, however I didn’t need to prune it. The three branches have foliage that is in different health. One of which, the smallest on the right, has been poisoned, but is still producing foliage. The left hand branch is doing the majority of the growing.

 

hdrplApples and orange tree – thesr trees have been grown from seed.

 

hdrplOlea Europaea – a new edition and a birthday present to me.

 

hdrplFicus Benjamina – The first tree in my collection. A combination of growing this in a grow tent and over feeding meant that it shed most of its leaves. I didn’t think that I would be able to rescue it. It’s grown about 10cm this spring and is probably ready for re-potting. It’s wonderful to see this tree return to health.

 

qrfOullins Golden Gage – Another birthday to me. This plum tree was delivered with many broken branches and clearly hadn’t been watered properly in the weeks leading up to delivery. However, I’m sure that some of the branches are health enough to promote some growth.

 

 

Exercise 3.5 – Photographs From Text

Brief:- History painting was a specific genre of painting that depicted scenes from religious, historical or mythological texts.  Choose a text that has meaning for you. It can be anything from a poem to a newspaper report, a biblical passage or a scene in a novel. It can be a long text, but it would probably be best if it was reasonably short, even a few lines. You’ll need to know your text by heart, so read it repeatedly.

Try to generate visual ideas that communicate something about the text. Discuss the text with other people and find out what images spring to mind for them. Write down any ideas you get from the text. They can be visual ideas or thoughts about the subject.

How would you turn that text into a photograph or a series of photographs?

  • Begin by thinking of a literal translation from the text, like a movie or a biblical painting.
  • Next, try to think in more metaphorical and symbolic ways. Text can be didactic, but you don’t have to illustrate the text; you can use it as a starting point for your picture making or you can create a broad interpretation based on the intuitive or emotional meaning the text has for you. For example, the Resurrection may cause joy and this joy could be metaphorically expressed in an explosion of colour, as in the work of Polly Apfelbaum.

When you’ve finished your work, place the photograph or photographs you’ve made with the text, side-by-side.

Leisure

by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Leisure by William Henry Davies

Reflections

What a lot of fun I have had whilst making this sequence, I have thoroughly enjoyed it. Because I read the course manual before I started Foundations in Photography, I had planned to use Leisure by William Henry Davies from the outset. It is probably my favourite poem, and one that is etched in my memory. My intention had always been to make this as close to a literal representation as I could do.

Technically this has been quite straight forward, with the only challenges coming from using Photoshop to remove an electric fence in the scene with the cows, and also from trying to get the text size correct. This has been difficult because I have taken the photos on four different cameras, each with their own dimensions, and because they have all been cropped to different ratios so that I could make each omage how I wanted them. I felt that it was important to get the text correct on the full size image, rather than the 1080p that I have saved the photos as, so that if I need to rework a photo then I have the original in its complete form.

The text has not worked out, and this is easy to correct by saving the original without text to 1080p and then increasing the canvas size and adding text, which can now be added at the same size.

I am going to go back and do this, but I felt that it was important to, as my former school teachers would say, show my workings out not just the answers.

Because this has been planned for a long time, than I have had the opportunity to take these photos in many places that I have visited, although I have had to include two from before I began Foundations in Photography so that I could retain the narrative, and two portraits from previous coursework.

 

 

Exercise 3.1 – Searching

Brief:- Take at least a couple of hours or more to wander around. Don’t be shy; you won’t be arrested, you’re not breaking the law. You’re doing exactly what most photographers do every day. When we search we don’t necessarily have a clear idea of what we’re looking for. However, the act of searching is never aimless because to search implies an open-ness to finding. It also helps us to hone our ideas, to sort out what is and isn’t relevant. There will come a time when you need to consolidate a body of work, but for now you’re free. When you’ve uploaded your photos decide whether to arrange them as smaller images in a scroll that reflects the journey you made. Or pick out some individual images.

The exercise was a lot of fun. I went out to a small village called Danby on the eastern edge of the North York Moors. It was a place which I haven’t been to before, was accessible, and it’s always enjoyable to photograph in a new place. Unfortunately I didn’t have the time to go to the Moors National Park Centre, nor the Inspired By gallery. That is on my agenda for a future time and an earlier train, maybe a bit of sun as well, its good to be warm.

The first thing that I photographed when I got off of the train was a small bush, and a large Monkey Puzzle tree (Whitby Jet is the fossilised monkey puzzle). I started photographing and texture, lines and geometry became an unscripted theme to explore. I photographed footprints, stones, trees, tree bark, plants, landscapes and an RAF Hawk trainer/fighter.

My difficulty has come with deciding how to present the photos. The review of Michael Wolf (seen here) was inspiring, but his series are so well presented that I have had difficulty with selecting photos and grouping them together to try and replicate his quality.

Trees

Grid-no-ayers

Geometry

Grid-no-layers

Macro

Grid-no-layers

I feel that all of the grids are presentable, but geometry more so. The layout for that works well, and adds to the geometric theme, as well as being easy on the eye. It matches concrete with concrete, wood with wood, and post with post.

Macro could possibly have done with an extra photo, but to be honest I wasn’t pleased with the others that I shot on the day. The first two photos are of a good quality technically and aesthetically, although the third lacks clarity towards the edges of the thorn.

Trees is a consistent series but it lacks punch, and that’s because of the first three photos. If I were to take a few more photos similar to the bottom pairing and add those, it would improve the series considerably.

As always I welcome critique and feedback.

 

 

Blarney Castle – Caisleán na Blarnan

Somewhere that I will have to go back to. I spent a few hours at the castle and the 60 acre estate, but as a photographer, taking my time to find the things that interest me, I hardly explored any of the grounds. However, here are my top ten, starting with my favourite. Oh and before you ask, no I did not kiss the Blarney Stone, just a wee bit to scary for me.

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For information about Blarney Castle please visit https://blarneycastle.ie